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Summary of Curriculum Requirements for Texas

Posted by Hope Scott on Sunday, January 23, 2011 Under: curriculum management

"The Texas Education Code (TEC) is a set of the state statutes (laws) governing public education in Texas. It applies to all educational institutions supported in whole or in part by state tax funds, unless specifically excluded by the code. The TEC directs the goals and framework of public education in Texas. It is established by the Texas Legislature."[1]

74.1  Essential Knowledge and Skills

This section, 74.1,  of the education code contains required curriculum for students from kindergarten to 12th grade. It breaks requirements into two distinct parts, namely foundation and enrichments.  Foundation courses include all cores subjects, i.e., English, math, social studies, and science.  Enrichment include fine arts, speech, foreign languages, health, career and technology, and religious courses. 

74.2  Description of a Required Elementary Curriculum

This section gives a list of courses that must be taught in elementary school, grades kindergarten to 5th.  The list includes foundation and enrichment classes.  It also mandates that teachers should have sufficient time to teach and student to learn these subjects. 

74.3  Description of a Required Secondary Curriculum

The required curriculum for secondary schools is listed here.  The first section deals with grades 6th - 8th.  It states that students who entered 6th grade this school year must complete one fine arts course in grades6, 7, or 8.   The second section gives a list of course to be taught from grades 9th - 12th  and states that, "The school district must offer the courses listed in this paragraph and maintain evidence that students have the opportunity to take these courses."[2] The list is comprehensive and gives title of class and how many of each is required to be taught.  For example, not only does it state that English language arts must be taught, it also states that students must take English I, II, III, and IV.  It give the same amount of detail to each subject required to be taught in classrooms across Texas.

74.4  English Language Proficiency Standards

Section 74.4 gives a lengthy English Language Proficiency Standards.  It states that, "In order for ELLs to be successful, they must acquire both social and academic language proficiency in English. Social language proficiency in English consists of the English needed for daily social interactions. Academic language proficiency consists of the English needed to think critically, understand and learn new concepts, process complex academic material, and interact and communicate in English academic settings."[3]  This section lists school district responsibility and gives proficiency level indicators.

74.62 Minimum High School Program

This section starts with an important disclaimer, namely, "Graduates of each high school are awarded the same type of diploma. The transcript or academic achievement record (AAR), rather than the diploma, records individual accomplishments, achievements, and courses completed and displays appropriate graduation seals."[4] The minimum high school program requires that students earn 22 credits to graduate.  It does not require the extra math and only 2 science credits unlike the state's new 4x4 plan which require four math and science credits.

74.63 Recommended High School Program

This graduation requirement states that a student must earn 26 credits to graduate.  This plan requires four math and science credits, hence the state's new 4x4 plan, along with four English language art credits, three and one half social studies and one half credit for economics. 
This program also outlines the enrichment courses and their credits.

 

74.64 Distinguished Achievement High School Program—Advanced High School Program

This program of study also requires 26 credits to graduate.  In addition to the 26 credits, students are expected to complete "Advanced measures. A student also must achieve any combination of four of the following advanced measures. Original research/projects may not be used for more than two of the four advanced measures. The measures must focus on demonstrated student performance at the college or professional level. Student performance on advanced measures must be assessed through an external review process."[5]

 

[1] Texas Education Agency. Texas Education Code. Retrieved January 17, 2011 from http://portals.tea.state.tx.us/page.aspx?id=920&bc=506

[2] Texas Education Agency Chapter 74. Curriculum Requirements. Subchapter A. Required Curriculum. Section 74.3 Description of a Required Secondary Curriculum. Retrieved January 17, 2011 from http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html

[3] Same as above. Section 74.4 English Language Proficiency Standards.  Retrieved January 17, 2011 from http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html

[4] Same as above. Section 74.61High School Graduation Requirements.  Retrieved January 17, 2011 from http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074b.html

[5] Same as above. 74.64. Distinguished Achievement High School Program--Advanced High School Program.  Retrieved January 17, 2010 from http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074f.html

In : curriculum management 


Tags: teks tec "texas education agency" "foundation curriculum" "enrichment curriculum" 

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Hope Scott I am a Web Technologies teacher. I created this blog as part of my Master of Education in Educational Technology Leadership for Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas.

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